Rock Music Doesn't Need Robots

For over a decade, songwriter, singer, and musician Sean Anthony Sullivan has been cutting records that fit the soundtrack of a cruise by the lake or a weekend spent dropping a big block in a muscle car. His sound, rich in guitar riffs and powerful vocals has been referred to as a new-generation Seger, Mellencamp, or Springsteen. All this while scorning the AI that is threatening to take away our musical souls.

Like any other kid growing up in the 80s, his childhood home was filled with an assortment of vinyl records that each seemed destined to define Sean’s musical tastes. But it was the moment that the needle dropped on Chicago’s “25 or 6 to 4,” exposing Terry Kath’s signature licks, that he knew he was destined to pursue a life-long love affair with 70’s rock and more specifically the sound of an overdriven guitar.

The sound he delivers today was instilled against the backdrop of the hard-working tones of the Midwest culture. Growing up in Michigan, surrounded by industry and Detroit muscle, every composition in Sullivan’s extensive catalog of original rock ’n’ roll music reveals those origins whether it be front and center or tucked away in the nuances of a guitar lick or vocal inflection.

It seems like every generation has an opportunity to embrace rock, but when it comes to popularity, the competitors always seemingly win out. In the 70s it was disco, in the 80s it was synth-pop, and so on. Today, it’s the world of EDM, which while entertaining, is missing the qualities that make you want to grab a wrench out of your toolbox and start tweaking a muscle car.

As a successful software engineer, Sean lives a life of continual immersion in the latest tech and innovations— a world he loves. He brings this passion into the practice of creating DIY guitar effects and embracing the latest in recording technologies. From a genre standpoint, he sidesteps the popular electronica found on his colleagues’ headphones and focuses on his roots and the obsession with the primal sound of an electric guitar into a cranked up amplifier. His sound is that of guitar riffs filled with swagger and gritty vocals that are human, something AI is going to be hard pressed to replace. “Technology should be used to create and capture the sound, not be the sound.”

In his words, “If my records can’t serve as the soundtrack to your road trip in a souped up ‘68 Camaro, then I’m not being authentic to myself and the music I love.”

Sullivan’s first widely distributed album as as a recording artist was Sullivan DeMott's “Live For Today” in 2009, co-written and produced with life-long musical collaborator Casey DeMott. After releasing many follow up singles, Sean Anthony Sullivan started releasing music under his given name. With the 2015 release of “Shooting on a Blue Moon,” the rock sound reached a new level of reception, with tracks receiving praise as sounding like “Bryan Adams’ rockier songs,” which he’ll take as a compliment.

His newest album, “In a Dusty Dream,” released 5/11/18.